WE ARE WEEABOOS

Dude Soup Post Show: WE ARE WEEABOOS

Since we're all in Sydney, we spend this Post Show figuring out why anime make y'all crazy.

Binge Mode

More Dude Soup Post Show

See All Dude Soup Post Show Videos

Other Videos You'll Like

Comments (52)

  • HarrisonD FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    What Lawrence said was so cool, man. I like it when they get this serious every now and again, it's really refreshing to hear. Means a lot to me dude.

  • Space-Potato FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold Space-Potato

    1 month ago

    I feel like this post show should be made available to the public

  • AbstractClss FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    Where did Adam get that sweater, I want it!

  • CirisGecko FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    On both the points of the podcast and on RWBY being an anime it always cracks me up when on r/anime someone asks for suggestions on new anime to watch and list RWBY as one they like or don't like there is one or more comments not giving a suggestion and only saying that RWBY is not an anime.

  • beastdude FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold Rock god in training

    1 month ago

    Sounds like the dude is experiencing the first moments of a splitting circle. Basically over time you and your friends grow apart, gaining different likes, dislikes, etc. It's something that just happens, like a natural drift. You could stay friends but slowly chat less, meet up less, see each other and hang out less. it sucks but you also find your own feet, likes, and stuff and go with them.

    Anime is just one of many things people are fans of. There's sports, tv shows, films, books, pubs, music, etc. You'll also always have the extreme side of these things, where fans are hardcore into it. It's ok to not be into something your friend is. they're not at fault and neither are you, it's just a person finding their thing in the world.

  • ajpantuso FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    Actually don't remember when I first heard the term anime. I remember when cartoon network was added to my cable package because I grew up with the flood of cartoons that came after the success of animated films in the 80s and early 90s and there were so many syndicated shows and cartoon network originals that I loved. Sailor Moon was the first anime I remember followed shortly by Dragon Ball Z, but I only thought of them as cool looking cartoons. Toonami made me more conscious of the fact that there was a whole world of japanese animation, but it probably wasn't until Adult Swim's Saturday night programming that I understood that anime had been around for a long time and I was only just experiencing it. I got pretty into manga and anime related merch, but even in New York it was difficult to find that shit. Around 14 I cast aside things that I thought were childish anime and cartoons in general being pretty high on the list. Spent most of high school and college thinking the people in the anime club or with konoha headbands were freaks even though anime was a huge part of my childhood. I realize now that I marginalized those kids because they were comfortable being different. I had felt like I needed to present myself as very normal to fit in and they challenged that notion. I'm sure they were aware of this and I think the attitude I had is part of a larger societal trend that fomented a need to make their love of anime exclusive and precious. I'm sure hipsters hopped onto that shit like anything else because it's easier than being self aware, but I think there was a fracturing that occurred that established those for whom anime is holy and those who see anime as a barrier to normalcy. I also understand why it would be upsetting to have people claim to be a part of the anime community when they didn't spend all of middle school being harassed for drawing anime characters in class. So in short, it's possible to chalk this up to internet hipsterdom and blogosphere bullshit, but I think there is a deeper societal issue at play. 

  • Hausmate FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    Left the pod running in the background, came back in on James: "double penetration porn", knew this was gonna be a good one.

  • MoistDucks FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    that was an interesting speech Lawrence, made me feel like im watching one of dem smart podcasts

  • Whysaac FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold Edgelord Supreme

    1 month ago

    I think Bruce really hit the nail on the head with his point about weebs essentially just being hipsters.


    Everything I can think of that people are 'fans' of, or like, has this kind of mentality in the most extreme examples.


    With anime, they might try to incorporate Japanese culture into their lifestyle, or learn the language, and constantly talk about Anime. This isn't exclusive to anime superfans whatsoever.


    Look at the metal scene. The most 'hardcore' metal heads dress a certain way, act a certain way, talk about metal constantly, and have disdain for people who like other types of music. The exact same thing can be said of superfans of any other genre of music; hip-hop, you have 'wankstas', with country, you have people who wear cowboy hats and boots and shit like that. Literally every type of music I can think of has a group of fans who basically embody the weaboo stereotype.


    The same can be said of other genres of TV shows and movies, though it tends, more often, to be inverted; most people have a genre or two that they don't enjoy, and many of those people end up looking down on people who do enjoy those genres, from corny action flicks, to shit like Twilight. This also extends to literature.


    This isn't even limited to entertainment, though. I'm a techie. I'll admit, sometimes, I catch myself looking down on people who don't 'get' computers, and I definitely devote what some of those people would consider an unhealthy amount of time to computers, etc.


    As a software developer, I get to see this shit to a ridiculous extent with things like programming languages, design paradigms, methodologies and stuff that the vast majority of people have never even thought about.


    Another, very obvious example is politics; there are people who will dislike you for no other reason than your supporting a different party to them.


    You even see this shit with 'dog people' and 'cat people'; I know people who absolutely despise either, and there are people who absolutely take what is a minor, personal preference, too far.


    The issue isn't the genre/particular thing. The 'issue' is that people form social groups based on personal preferences and similarities they have to one another, and, when they manage to isolate themselves enough from differing viewpoints on a certain thing, they end up having a hipster-like mentality about it.


    People like to talk about, emulate, and excel at their passions. It's not a good thing, or a bad thing in and of itself. It's frustrating when you're excluded from a conversation, or looked down on because of it, but everybody does this sort of shit.

  • ShalashaskaOcelot

    1 month ago

    Damn, Lawrences Speech at around -13 minutes in was deep. Like, waay deep. In a good way, props to him for how well spoken that was. That speech alone made my first First membership worth it.

  • BQJmcF FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    I really like listening to the in-depth discussion of this stuff. Nice postshow !

  • SeronWhite FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

       So what you guys were saying about the groups having a superiority complex, such as me playing Halo and being told to play a "Real Man's" game like Dark Souls, does exist with everything. I go to a lot of cons and I was at one being made fun of for my cosplay. They said that it was stupid, the games it was based on were dumb, and that they didn't like how I was caring around a prop gun with it. I was a STARS member from Resident Evil and had the Samurai Edge M9 from the games. The guy actually was following me around constantly making fun of me, berating me, and just insulting everything that I tried to look at. I found the complete series to Spice and Wolf on Blue-ray, great series I fully recommend it, he starting get in my face about it and smacked it out of my hands. I asked the person running the stand to hang on to it, and I left. The man was still following me so I led him to the security check station and told the police stationed there what had been happening. The guy said it wasn't true, so I directed them to the tables I had visited and they all confirmed my story. He was kicked out and banned from all cons there.

  • SeronWhite FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

        I started anime when I was in the first grade with DBZ, Ghost in the Shell, and many that were like that, needless to say, my mom didn't want me watching it, but I was exposed to it at a very young age. My friends and I used to fight during recess like they did in DBZ, we would get yelled at a lot for it, but we knew it wasn't real. There were times my friends insisted that many of the anime were how life should be, in terms of the charter types and how other characters interacted with them.


     I have seen many from the 90's and a lot of anime like Highschool DxD, I was not influenced by them into thinking that that is how things should be. That I should have all of these girls after me, taking off their clothes, and doing all that stuff you see in harem style anime. True, at the time I was in my early teens and watched them cause "BOOBIES!!" but when I started to watch them for story I quickly lost interest in those anime. Many people that are so easily influenced by those things tend to either be super young or have a certain mental state that makes them easily influenced.


  • Bismarckee FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    Is it bad that I know the Character from the thumb nail?

  • lootsorrow FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    That's not just anime-civil-war, that's specifically all girls from [email protected]Purely coincidental that there aren't any black girls to be warmachine. And if I know weeaboos, I would guess that the choice of which Im@ character is used for which marvel character is based on loads and loads of character-archtype and relationship comparisons. It's just how these things usually work out.


    Also Bruce beat everyone for this entire postshow in a single sentence "They're just people that think that what they like is better than what you like."

  • lootsorrow FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    It's too bad the mics are on fixtures, because James can't drop his when he says "You mean made in japan by koreans"

  • GawsHawg FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    I Like Anime Too

  • GrumpyDruunk FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold GrumpyDruunk

    1 month ago

    I nominate Lar for another year of "The Quintessential Gamer" position.

  • wickedsnakes FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    Hey, Elyse, I watch mostly seinen too :) 

  • JarrydBracke FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    This post-show was very very interesting and almost cathartic to hear. I was pretty much "that guy" they described in high school. Depressed, antisocial, cynical for no reason, too snobby/rude even for the other anime kids to like, spoke in strange references, etc. I didn't have anyone I would call a "friend" in high school. And when James mentioned somebody imprinting themselves onto characters like shinji I immediately understood because I'd felt that myself.


    I don't blame anime for my problems because it was more a symptom of them than the cause. It certainly reinforced a lot of problematic ideas and mindsets that I had rattling in my head which caused problems further down the road. I feel like a lot of people have the same experiences during very crucial developmental years and then never break out of those harmful mindsets. Lawrence hit the nail on the head with his "it's easy to make friends as a kid, if you share interests you're immediately friends" and some people in nerd culture never break out of this use of pop culture as their primary method of social interaction. This ties into the whole culture of exclusion at the center of nerd culture that others have written much better about.


     At this point I'm going to get a little more personal and it isn't related much to the anime talk but self-improvement and Lawrence's call for people who've had similar experiences and what they're doing with themselves. 


    After graduating I went to college for a major I didn't want because I was following my parents wishes, dropped out after a year with crippling depression and it took a little under 3 years of therapy and self-care (with some medication sprinkled in there) until I felt like I was at a level where I could enter back into society and function normally again. This came with a lot of new resolutions for the new person I wanted to be.


     I decided I didn't want to be a cynic anymore. I always thought being cynical was "cool" until I learned firsthand it just made me profoundly unhappy. I decided I would no longer care so much about everyone liking me, because people like you a lot more when you don't try so hard. I didn't want to be the "know it all" anymore and found peacefulness in a measure of ignorance. And finally I had to truly examine some very harmful ideas i'd cemented in my head in regards to women, which I do partially attribute to binging shitty anime during some very formative years. Today I am 24, in my junior year of college for a new major that I love (agriculture), I feel happier than I ever have before, and I even met a cute girl and began an actual relationship for the first time in my life. I absolutely feel like I have "missed out" and feel like i'm playing catch-up in regards to social experiences with my peers, but it doesn't bother me much anymore whereas it used to be crippling. 


    Finally to round this out THANK YOU JAMES/LAWRENCE for very clearly saying online interaction is not human interaction! I almost wish this discussion took place on dude soup so that message in particular could be heard by a larger audience. It took me a long time to figure this out and these days I don't even engage with 99% of internet comments because it's like they're on a different plane of existence than I am, I would try speaking to them like a regular person and nothing I say would get through. 


    Wew. There's my impromptu essay. Thanks if anyone read this far. 

  • wickedsnakes FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    I actually watched my very first anime in my mid-20s. I was never interested in it before, but almost by accident I watched kill la kill, and fell in love, and kept watching anime ever since. I don't think it changed me in any way, it was more like discovering a new genre of music that you love :) 

    • Jerran FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold Wheres the Beef?

      1 month ago

      The First actual anime I watched was Fairy Tale when Michael said he was going to be apart of the cast. That was in my 20's. I fell in love, and now I watch anime almost exclusively. 

  • Decrozi FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold Anime fan

    1 month ago

    Isn't it all just an inside/outside issue. When I hear Geoff and Michael talk for ten minutes about "Always Sunny", it makes no sense because I don't watch that show. So if I talk about "Shimoneta" for ten minutes, others would be confused because they don't know the show and so everything I say would sound strange.
    Another problem with anime is saying anime is like saying video games, television, movies, or books. It's a general term. Anime is getting the same ugh that video games got twenty years ago and TV before that and movies before that.
    In the end, the only thing that helps you to learn to interact with people... is interacting with people. Anime, video games, television, movies, and books are distractions, but a common interest in any of those will give you a starting point for... interacting with people that share that interest.

  • melyssaaaaa FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    i used to watch sailor moon, dragon ball, and inuyasha when i was younger (elementary school and into middle school), but i never went further than that. i didn't know what anime for a while, i just thought they were different kinds of cartoons. as i got older, i ran into many of those people who, as soon as you mention that you like anything related to anime, would scream and act out and shout japanese terms. not only was it intimidating (they're obviously a bigger fan than i am), but it was embarrassing and frustrating to try and connect/communicate with them because they only wanted to discuss anime and sometimes talk down to you. now that i'm in my mid-20s and anime is more widely accepted, i'm trying to get back into it but it's still intimidating because there, unfortunately, are still people who try to act as if they're better than you because they've been watching it longer. the community around anime is much more difficult to enjoy than anime itself.

    • wickedsnakes FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

      1 month ago

      I watched my very first anime in my mid-20's :) imagine that :) I saw kill la kill, and fell in love with it, and been watching anime ever since. no one around me watches it, so what I do is just enjoy the shows by myself and I do not discuss it with anyone. kind of sad, but hey what you gonna do? its better to enjoy anime and not talk about it than not to watch it at all :) 

  • Ninpo64 FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    Hilariously enough, in Japan, they don't really differentiate western animation and eastern animation aside from what categories they might be in, so stuff like Avatar and RWBY would probably be in the same category as Naruto and One Piece and such. Though someone can correct me if I'm wrong.


    Also, I kinda think Cartoon Network helped quite a bit in exposing the western world with anime

    not only with stuff from Toonami and [adult swim], but also airing things like Speed Racer and Science Ninja Team Gatchaman (G-Force Guardians of the Galaxy) with their regular line ups of like Hanna Barbera cartoons and stuff. That being said, that's also probably where anime got some of its stigma for just being another cartoon for kids and such, which may or may have not lead to some parents renting stuff like Akira and Ninja Scroll and Urotsukidoji from Blockbuster not really knowing what they were, kinda in a similar manner of how some parents would let their kids watch Family Guy and South Park since they're just cartoons, though with probably less mental scarring.

  • AussieTooth FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    Define normal... millions of people watch anime, are these millions of people all odd? or is just that they differ from the other millions.

  • Zikoro FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    This was very fun, insightful and kinda therapeutic since I was that kid that wanted to be an anime protagonist in my teen years.


    To start with, I got into anime in middle school with Dragon Ball Z, Sailor Moon, Pokemon, and such. It aired right after school so it had the perfect moment to escape from school (Because I was at the moment of ugg school). It was when Toonami started that I got REALLY into anime and what anime is. With Toonami, I got into Gundam, Tenchi Muyo, Outlaw Star, Eva, and so much more. The crazy adventures, the stories, the characters, and all that amazed me and I wanted to be in those worlds. I wanted to be the cool guy shooting the Caster Gun or summoning Light Hawk Wings. It probably didn't help that my parents were a bit strict that didn't let me out of the house except for school. It was school and then straight back home so anime (and video games) were my escape from home. 


    Then there was my high school days. OH BOY... With all the anime that was built into me by then, I moved to a different town for high school. Now losing your friends when you move is rough but dumb teenage me thought "Hey, I am moving, that means I can reinvent myself as the new mysterious kid like in those school type anime." Yeah, you can already tell that was one stupid decision to make. I was that guy who said stuff I learned from anime and such, but in reality, I was probably a studdering dweeb in the back corner of the classroom or that kid with a anime head band in class... Basically, I was a Chuunibyou. Like Elyse said, I thought I was that nice guy from anime and why wasn't anything special happening to me. In truth, that thought made me probably off putting to the people around me.  This leads to me not making almost no friends in my 4 years of high school. Lucky I did make some that I still talk to even now so it wasn't a total lost.


    And here I am now, 27 (28 in April 19th!). I feel the same as Lawrence now. I skipped so much of my adolescence. I never actually asked a girl out or any social interaction. But I would like to hope that I am now out of that phase now and talking to people and my classmates. I still enjoy anime but it isn't my whole life and I don't shape my life with it now. Sure, I will still go out and say stuff like Waifu, but I would see myself as a normal functioning human now. Or at least something close to it now.

  • Butters_straya20 FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    Started watching anime in my last year at school after watching most of the gateway anime: Attack on Titan, Yu Gi Oh, Full-metal Alchemist, Sword Art Online. Haven't looked back since, watch anime seasonally now and really enjoy it, even though none of my friends watch it or are interested in it other than Attack On Titan, I don't let it bother me that they don't like it, because its obviously not for everyone and they put up with me talking about it occasionally because I don't try and shove it down their throats and force them to watch stuff. Although I will occasionally recommend a good action anime like Drifters as I feel like they would enjoy it, though it has to be dubbed as obviously if your not used to watching subbed its difficult to jump in and do it from the get go.

  • jesriv FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold RAWWRR

    1 month ago

    Hell yeah, Revy on the list!

  • RedStorm11628 FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    Whoever did the "Top 20 Most Badass Female Anime Characters" doesn't know the meaning of the word badass. Some of them were good, but the rest not so much.

  • Adamk1996 FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    I always find myself in an odd situation around friends when it comes to anime. One group of friends I have all watch anime. Attack on Titan, Cowboy Bebop, the pirate one, Dragon Ball, etc. The odd situation is that I never got into anime.


    I remember when I was a kid watch Teletoon or YTV and I would see a commercial for Dragon Ball Z and I would always just think "that looks weird" and continue watching Spongebob Squarepants. I am 21 now and despite the recommendations from my friends I have only ever seen anime movies like Ghost in the Shell --which was good, but I found it a little off-putting-- and the Studio Ghibli films like Spirited Away, Castle in the Sky, and My Neighbor Totoro. 

    A big thing that so far keeps me away from more entry-level anime shows is how much filler I am told anime will have. Apparently Naruto is pretty bad for filler episodes. I recall a night last year in college when my roommate was watching Naruto and the episode was literally about Naruto needing to find some ancient ninja method about eating a lot. He needed this so he could become the best eater in the village. Also a character --who's voice made me believe is a young girl, I have yet to confirm this-- showed Naruto her "Super Sexy Jutsu", or something along those lines, and then Naruto said her Sexy Jutsu was not good enough and then he showed her his.


    I just kept watching Mad Men.

  • SEAtliens FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    We basically spent 30 minutes watching what Lawrence does at home. 

  • MrOO8 FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

       I don't think that people who watch anime are weird I think it's how they act that gives them that reputation.

    I was never really a fan of the whole genera of anime but there were a few I like (Rwby because I really like story and an entire episode about preforming one move in a fight really never did anything to keep me invested) and at school their was a group of self proclaimed anime "experts". I would try to at least talk to them during class or something but they would only watch the anime that I just wasn't a fan of examples: naruto, dragon ball, and so on and so forth. So they would act like they were above me. I grew up with the notion that they built that group because none of them played Sports or were doing school activities and just wanted something to be apart of so they started acting like characters and wouldn't really leave the group which kind of make their world only involve a few people that they deemed ok. This led to them being outcasts during highschool and made it hard for them to reconnect to the life we lived. 

       This is why I have a some what bitterness or dislike of the people that love anime. Even though I have met very nice people like you that watch it regularly. But I still feel that the emotions and actions of the characters do become how thoes people act with the world and can cause a lot of problems later on. I don't judge people that watch anime but when their actions towards people are not normal the stigma that people who love anime are weird seems to fit.  Thanks 

    Peter 

  • IpBlood FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold David

    1 month ago

    hi guys, Lawrence I hope you find this. I've worked in a retail store for about 4 years now that sells anime merchandise (made it up to manager now, shout out!). I have seen all sorts of people come through. I do watch anime and admire the stories and different art styles and such and every now and then I'll talk to customers about it to pass the time on slow days. What I have experienced is that it is the people who take liking something too far. Extremists is the term, and if you look at anything in the world when people take liking things to an extreme they kind of ruin it. Example: religious extremists who fight to suppress other religions, sports fanatics burning and rioting when their team loses,(even wrestling James) these people just can't let a thing simply be and accept it for what it is but instead feel the need to become it. They let it take over their life to an unhealthy point and they lose all empathy and if you don't identify the same you are a lesser being. It's stems from the existential crises that everyone has inside when trying to answer ,"who am I !!!!" . They find something that makes them feel good and close off the rest of the world because they cannot understand anything outside it.   

  • Dlar FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    I kept pausing the video trying to clear the notification in the lower right.

  • nicolegend FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold dangereqsue

    1 month ago

    when i was about 11/12 i stumbled across a gundam wing marathon on late night tv and stayed up all night watching it... a decision that changed my life forever lmfao. ended up spiraling into a full on weeaboo phase that spanned my formative years.

  • Knetexh Knetexh

    1 month ago

    13:33 Is literally me with funhaus. I found funhaus at just the right time, and as much as I love them and want other people to find and appreciate them, I don't want them to get too popular. 

  • Rear_Admirer_JaBooty FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold That's so bones

    1 month ago

    lol DxD shows up first when he searched anime. I can't wait for the accidental nudity in the post show

  • HankMcCool FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    I would like to personally thank RT for getting me out my otaku phase

    • HankMcCool FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

      1 month ago

      more in the fact that now all I watch is RT content instead of anime rather than me saying this discussion impacted me in that way, It's been a long time since I was an embarassment

  • EggsCaliber FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    True story, I got into anime because about two or so years ago I heard Bruce and James mentioning Attack On Titan in some video. So I was curious and decided to check it out and it turned out they were right, it was pretty cool. So thanks Funhaus for introducing me to a new medium.

  • 8bitdee FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold my views are your own

    1 month ago

    I somewhat agree with the guy who made that post. As someone who liked anime a lot in my teenage years, and still kinda do (I'm 29 now, but I just watch one anime out of nostalgia. Dragon Ball will always have my heart!), it does become annoying when you try to interact with people who still love anime deeply and are close to or in their 30s. I have friends from high school on facebook who constantly post anime photos/videos, anime memes, anime references to the point that it's ALL they do. That's their form of socializing. It's like they don't know how to talk to others without referencing some funny quote from an anime or something like that. 


    Now, that's not to say I dislike those people. They're my friends. There's absolutely nothing wrong with being comfortable enough to proudly display your love for something, so more power to them. They're still my friends, but I just have a hard time talking to them. Not because I cannot relate to the way they interact with people, as someone who used to be heavily into anime I understand their jokes and whatnot, but simply because I cannot stand that form of interaction.

  • WoodcocksJohnson FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    I think Bruce is totally right about "weeaboos" being essentially thing as hipsters of any media. I think the thing that makes anime more taboo or looked down on is because unlike what Elyse said, I don't see anime as being mainstream in our culture. I think awareness of anime is mainstream, but there is not a familiarity like there is with other fanatic communities.

    If someone is fanatical about football, the average US citizen is relatively familiar with the sport and the culture surrounding it. If someone is fanatical about Star Wars, the references have permeated our pop culture, so the average person can identify that culture without even having seen the movies. If a person is a hipster with indie music, the average person can look at their favorite indie band and say, "there's the drummer, there's the singer, and there's the guitarist." When it comes to anime, the average person's familiarity probably only reaches about as far as Dragonball Z or something of that ilk. Anime stories and tropes comes from an Eastern culture, which is generally understood to differ in many ways from Western culture. Therefore, it's more difficult for the average US citizen to relate to the passion of an anime fanatic in the way they can relate to someone's passion towards something ingrained in our own culture. 

    From a psychological perspective, we dislike cognitive dissonance, so we try to resolve it in the easiest way. If we can relate to someone's fanaticism, we can make negative attributions about the person's other characteristics and not their passion. "That person is a hipster" rather than "that person's music made them weird." With anime, many people don't have that identification with the medium or the culture that made it, so we see it as separate from ourselves, attribute the person's negative characteristics to the medium, and say "those foreign cartoons made them weird" rather than "that person spends too much time watching anime". But take my opinion with a grain of salt. I can say I'm working on an advanced degree in psychology, but it's not specifically in social psych, so I can't claim to be an expert on this topic.

  • Gudren FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    The Neon genesis talk was lovely, the analysis Hideki Anno does about depression is interesting. I was that guy, but I always felt that the overt obsession was insane. I always felt that the act of putting it on a pedestal making it your identity does more damage than good.

  • beedle246 FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold Do not be Cody Be Haggar

    1 month ago

    Mid 80's to early 90's Anime is the best ala Fist of the north star

  • PaddyCG

    1 month ago

    I agree that anime doesn't somehow corrupt the mind and turn people into 'weirdos'. However, I've been watching anime for nine years now and not a day goes by that I don't read some amount of manga, yet I stopped telling people I liked anime since I was 18 (I'm 21). Almost everyone I have met that shares my love for anime has made me embarrassed for my interest. I remember one kid back at school that regularly wore cat ears; asking everyone to either choose from the words 'yuri, or yaoi', if they said yaoi he would then giggle for about a minute each time. The final straw was when I met a girl at college that as soon as she found out I liked anime she screamed 'OTAKU!'ever so proudly, and then showed me her hentai drawings (which sucked). 

    I just remembered I did actually mention it when I was 19 to some stranger. It was a new class and the dude next to me was making anime references, so I thought I'd give it a go and make one back... He swirled a victory sign pose over his left eye that must have contained a plethora of mahou shoujo spirit and bellowed 'KAWAII' so loud the class stopped - he even got out a beyblade and cardfight vanguard cards out at some point.

    Those are only a tiny percent of the interactions I've had with fellow anime fans. Some have been nice, but they've been eclipsed by the bad

    • improvis FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

      1 month ago

      This is why its easier to just keep it on reddit

  • HenroTee FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    The "Anything I say is right and if you disagree you are wrong" mentality is definitely not something exclusive to anime fans. It's something that plagues the internet in general, especially when it comes to film discussion. That kind of mentality has really made the internet a very toxic environment to discuss film. Like you can't like a somewhat critically mixed film or you will be labeled a fanboy. And vice versa, you can't dislike a critical succesful film or you will be labeled a hater. Which James experienced first had when he expressed his opinions on Doctor Strange. They don't seem to understand that film is a subjective art form, sure there are certain qualities that a film needs to have, but overall films or any piece of art are received and perceived differently depending on the person. That is what makes art so interesting in the first place, but it seems to be entirely lost on these people. There is no interesting film discussion to be had when you are just talking to a wall.

    • DiegoTheGecko FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

      1 month ago

      I agree, and then some. I don't think it is unique to any media/hobby as Papa B was hitting on. I feel it is a symptom of youth and passion. Like Big L-dawg said, most young people believe they know everything for a period of time. Combine that with a passion about something, then one can get all high and mighty believing the thing they like is best. I mean I still do it about things (e.g. Rugby League vs Rugby Union) and I am adult adjacent. And as you hit on perfectly, it is veering away from the popular mainstream that gains you a label. And while anime may be more mainstream as Khaleesi-Eleesi said, it still isn't the perfect middle of mainstream while also having its old stigma of being for nerds and weirdos that it used to have. But the same stigma existed(exists?) with video games and I think for the same reason that way back when, some of the people who got passionately into these things will have done so as they weren't good at playing with others, and instead of learning how to play with others, they could escape into playing games and watching anime. 

      And to comment on the fact that Amm0nius's friend (who I will call Derick) wanted to talk about something he was passionate about, that too is not unique. We all do it too regardless of media, generally in the form of 'Did you play this game yet?', 'Did you see the match on Saturday?', 'Have you heard the new album by blah?' and 'Did you catch the latest episode of show?'. I feel like Amm0nius wasn't interested in Derick's new hobby, and so didn't care about what he was talking about. Which is what made Derick annoying, which I can imagine made Derick annoyed at Amm0nius as he wasn't listening to what Derick liked/cared about.

      That brings me back to what you have said here HenroTee, that when it comes to a passion, people would rather have an opinion (or in the case of a listener without that particular passion, apathy) rather than a discussion of it. The internet may have exacerbated this but I am pretty sure it existed before hand, the difference now is you can shout at/get shouted at by more people.

  • DumbMcLoser FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    The girl in the thumbnail is Haruka Takayama from Sakura Trick

    • Jerran FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold Wheres the Beef?

      1 month ago

      She's great! I've actually been rewatching Sakura Trick for the umpteenth time when the thumb showed up.